Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Fly Higher - Mantras for Ascension FREE download



Four days left  for a beautiful, cleansing Free audio download Mantras for Ascension.
Until the 30th of June 2017, you still have the chance so don't miss out.

The FREE download gift from Maureen J. St. Germain for the June issue of The Echo World is Mantras for Ascension.
Go to www.maureenstgermain.com/Echo/ and sign up for your download of these beautiful mantras.

Below you can find my review of Mantras for Ascension, from the May issue of The Echo World.


Mantras for Ascension by Maureen J. St. Germain
review by Sofia Karin Axelsson The Echo World, May issue 2017

Mantras for Ascension contains two healing chants, especially made to clear out old emotional pain, that can hold us back from experiencing our lives at the fullest level.

The first is the Hathor chant, “El Kar Leem Om.” This is an ancient Egyptian chant. Each sound represents one of the four sacred elements: El is earth, Ka is fire, Leem is water and Om is space or air. The elements are the building blocks of the universe, and this chant is supposed to help us get to a place where we can feel reverence for all the possibilities, and get closer to creation as a holy place. Beautiful, female, translucent voices repeat the chant.The second chant is Kadosh, Kadosh, Kadosh, Adenoi, Tsebayoth. This is a Kabbalistic chant, said to activate the grids in our bodies, and help us clear out “All that is not God.” This chant is built with a blend between female voices and a background of calm, supporting male voices.

So the big question is then – does it work? Let me say this. Late in the evening, with a deadline coming up, I started feeling a little low energy and discouraged. After listening to the thirty-five minute soundtrack I felt lighter, my head was clearer and I experienced that tingly feeling in and around me that we do when life is just the way it’s supposed to be: sweet, interesting, in the present and connected to the world as it is.



Find out more about Maureen J. St. Germain at: www.maureenstgermain.com

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

The World Tree, or “The Axis of Evil”



There is a World Tree at the center of the universe, a core of creation, from which the cosmos is organized: there’s an “above,” a “below,” and a “middle.” The middle is where humans live, together with all our relatives on Earth, together with seen and unseen forces. Or, so many indigenous peoples around the globe believe. From the Desana people in the Colombian Amazon, to the Sandawe people in Africa, to the Yakut people in Russia, the motif of this World Tree as an organizing principle of all-there-is can be found. The tree is the basis of creation, the place where humans can communicate with the gods. Today many pagans, new agers, and spiritual people have adopted, or re-constructed, this belief as a point of reference. With this worldview it is easy to see existence as structured, meaningful, and animated. All has soul, and all is connected. The motif of the World Tree always suited me personally. I use it as a way of orienting myself in many worlds. The tree makes it easy to know what is up, and what is down, however far into magical realms I may travel.



For the longest time, the worldview of the scientific community has been in opposition to that of the World Tree, or any other “primitive” ideas of a structured universe. Creation started with the Big Bang and the cosmos - with all its life-forms - isn’t anything but the result of random acts, sometimes ending in unprobable things like DNA and advanced cultures. Creation then, is a mere stroke of luck, so to say. But alas, some years ago scientific evidence started pouring in that indicated that there actually is something at the center of the universe: an axis, a polarized force, actually even a structuring force. Scientists quickly named this something “the axis of evil,” (with an unfortunate correlation to politics). This naming might be a result of the infamous, grim scientific sense of humor, but it also reflects the shadow side of a purely scientific worldview: a reluctance to admit that there might be anything else than a mechanical, random cosmos with no meaning. I do not blame scientists for this. It is their job to scrutinize every hard fact.

Meanwhile, if we are to look for meaning, we have to turn to more spiritual ways of moving in the world. The shadow side of such a way of moving is, of course, to view anything as meaningful, as well as the lure of claiming to have found deep truths, based on little more than a whim and a prayer. When we move in the vast space of spiritual beliefs, we have to scrutinize what we experience in a different way than the scientific community. We have no one to trust but ourselves. As the writers and wisdom keepers of The Echo World keep insisting, be it Terry-Cole Whittaker, Maureen J. St. Germain, or Frank DeMarco, we all have to keep listening to our inner voice, find what feels right to us, or ask our Higher Self for guidance. If we do not, it is easy to fall victim to those who try to tell us that they know better than we do, what is true and right. There are many cults and religious fanatics out there who would love to take over our life, if we are not careful.



Remember, whatever ideas and opinions presented in our magazine The Echo World, or that you read anywhere else, only you know if they ring true and are meaningful for you. Only you know if they fit into your personal view of the World Tree.

This is a slightly edited version of my editorial in The Echo World June issue 2017. Top and bottom with courtesy of Pixabay free download. Centre image is an Ash tree in my parents garden in Sweden, taken by me: Sofia Karin Axelsson.